ASBP: A Rough Start Leads to an Extra Month in Boot Camp
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A Rough Start Leads to an Extra Month in Boot Camp

06/28/2017
By Jeffery Diffy, ASBP Blood Donor Recruiter, North Chicago, Ill.
Seaman Recruit Cynthol Fuata, from Oceanside, California, needed blood as soon as she arrived to basic training. While she has fully recovered, she is forever grateful for those who helped her.
Seaman Recruit Cynthol Fuata, from Oceanside, California, needed blood as soon as she arrived to basic training. While she has fully recovered, she is forever grateful for those who helped her.
Seaman Recruit Cynthol Fuata began her boot camp journey on March 28, with the dedication, motivation and stamina needed to complete her basic training. During her processing days of initial training she received her uniforms and put on her seabag to transit to Ship 12 (USS Triton) to begin training; but shortly after, she began to feel light-headed. Fuata did not know how ill she was.

“The moment we arrived at Ship 12, we were IT’ed (intense training),” she said. “Afterwards, I was exhausted and thinking it was due to monthly related issues, I just went to sick call. As soon as I arrived and they did a red blood cell count, I was immediately transferred to the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center for treatment.

When she arrived, her red blood cell count was just 3.0 — well below the normal range of 4.2 and 5.4 for an adult woman.  

“As soon as I arrived, they were astounded that I could still walk,” she said. “They made me do jumping jacks and touch my toes to see if I was nauseated or light-headed. I was not. They did quickly give me blood and I instantly felt much better. I felt more energized and better than I have in a while.”

After a month of recovery in the Recruit Convalescent Unit at Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Illinois, Fuata was able to join Division 196 and finally begin her training.  

“I look forward to graduating boot camp on June 23, and then begin my ‘A’ school training in Pensacola, Florida, as an aviation boatswains mate fueling. Although I can’t donate blood for another 11 months, I intend to donate when I am first able to. I will donate in gratitude for what others have done for me with their donations and help when I needed it.  For that I will forever be grateful.”

About the Armed Services Blood Program
Since 1962, the Armed Services Blood Program has served as the sole provider of blood for the United States military. As a tri-service organization, the ASBP collects, processes, stores and distributes blood and blood products to Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families worldwide. As one of four national blood collection organizations trusted to ensure the nation has a safe, potent blood supply, the ASBP works closely with our civilian counterparts by sharing donors on military installations where there are no military blood collection centers and by sharing blood products in times of need to maximize availability of this national treasure. To find out more about the ASBP or to schedule an appointment to donate, please visit www.militaryblood.dod.mil. To interact directly with ASBP staff members, see more photos or get the latest news, follow @militaryblood on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube and Pinterest.  Find the drop. Donate.

The Armed Services Blood Program is a proud recipient of the Army Maj. Gen. Keith L. Ware Public Affairs award for journalism.