ASBP: CBIRF Gives Back and Gives Hope
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CBIRF Gives Back and Gives Hope

01/26/2018
By Donna Onwona, ASBP donor recruiter, National Capital Region
Ensuring that sufficient quantities of blood is collected on a daily basis is never easy but during the holiday season it can be especially daunting, with the week between Christmas and New Year’s being the most challenging. As donors are on leave, traveling and celebrating the holidays, the need for blood continues.

When Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Jake Kubil, ASBP blood drive coordinator and Reaction Force Company Lead Petty Officer at Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, Indian Head, Maryland, was asked if they could support a blood drive on Dec. 27, there was no hesitation. While CBIRF sponsors blood drives throughout the year with the Armed Services Blood Bank Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, Kubil and CBIRF leadership took on the challenge. Despite the fact that many of their Marines and corpsman were also on leave, their blood drive exceeded expectations and saved the day.

Navy Lt. Stephani Golla, director of the ASBBC- Bethesda, couldn’t agree more. "We really appreciate blood drive coordinators like Kubil, who really understand the need for donations during the holidays,” she stated. “Having a successful drive in part falls on the site coordinator to spread the word to their fellow command members, and to motivate and inspire them despite their minds being occupied by the hustle and bustle of the holiday season. Kubil does a great job of ensuring that each and every drive at CBIRF is a success."

While CBIRF sponsors blood drives throughout the year, this blood drive during the season of giving exemplified the commitment that their team has for the ASBP mission.

"Regardless what time of year it is, it's important for to us to donate to help out military treatment facilities across the Department of Defense that need to have blood available for transfusion. During the holidays, most people are on leave so we wanted to help make up for those losses and it's just one way that we can give back and give hope to ill and injured services members and their families," emphasized Kubil.

Golla reiterated how important blood drives are during the holidays and throughout the winter months, “Even though normal operations tend to slow down around the holidays, there are still active duty members overseas fighting, making sacrifices so that we can cherish time with our friends and families. We need to take time away from baking, shopping, and decorating to provide them with the life-saving products they need. I don't think there is a more important gift that we can give during the holiday season."

About the Armed Services Blood Program
Since 1962, the Armed Services Blood Program has served as the sole provider of blood for the United States military. As a tri-service organization, the ASBP collects, processes, stores and distributes blood and blood products to Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families worldwide. As one of four national blood collection organizations trusted to ensure the nation has a safe, potent blood supply, the ASBP works closely with our civilian counterparts by sharing donors on military installations where there are no military blood collection centers and by sharing blood products in times of need to maximize availability of this national treasure. To find out more about the ASBP or to schedule an appointment to donate, please visit www.militaryblood.dod.mil. To interact directly with ASBP staff members, see more photos or get the latest news, follow @militaryblood on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube and Pinterest. Find the drop. Donate.

The Armed Services Blood Program is a proud recipient of the Army Maj. Gen. Keith L. Ware Public Affairs award for journalism.