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Follow Navy Captain Fahie, program director, as he visits critical military blood program locations.

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ASBP Tech

Without blood donors, blood products would simply not be possible. This is the reason why most stories, and much of the information provided by blood collection organizations, are about donors, the donation process and those who receive blood.

But what about the science behind blood banking? What about the complex logistics, such as blood typing, testing, manufacturing, packing and transport? Did you know that Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom saw the lowest mortality rate in any conflict since blood transfusion therapy began in World War II?

The answers to many of these questions can be found in both the technology used in this field and the science of blood banking. Indeed, for blood banking and transfusion, scientific developments and the evolution of technology at times work side-by-side, and at other times overlap entirely. For example, we use information management tools to track and manage blood donors, blood products and blood recipients, while we use rapid testing kits in theater for emergency blood product typing in situations where inventory is low and the need is urgent.

Here in the ASBP Tech arena military blood bank scientists, technology experts and many others in the field will share their answers to these queries with recent research efforts, current thinking, and futuristic possibilities. We invite you to join them.

News

Air Force Special Ops Medics to Test Freeze-dried Plasma on the BattlefieldNew  Air Force Special Ops Medics to Test Freeze-dried Plasma on the Battlefield
By Charlsy Panzino, Air Force Times

Plasma makes up more than half of a person’s blood, and its clotting properties help stop bleeding —which is why medics carry the precious liquid, in frozen form, on the battlefield.

Frozen plasma needs to be kept cold, however, and lugging a freezer in combat isn’t exactly practical. That’s why the Department of Defense is working on bringing freeze-dried plasma to the U.S.


PATHOGEN REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY FUNDING APPROVED, ASBP ON THE FOREFRONT OF DEPLOYMENTPathogen Reduction Technology Funding Approved, ASBP on the Forefront of Deployment
By Jessica Pellegrini, ASBP Staff Writer

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has agreed to provide more than $48 million to Cerus Corp and the U.S. division of Japan’s Terumo Corp to fund pathogen reduction technologies (PRT) to help reduce the chance of the Zika virus and other blood borne diseases from being transmitted through the blood supply.


Researchers at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., are developing an automated validation and verification system to help ensure blood safety.GMU Researchers Developing System To Help Ensure Blood Safety
By Jessica Pellegrini, ASBP Staff Writer

Researchers at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., are developing an automated validation and verification system to help ensure blood safety.

Army Lt. Col. Mark Mellott, chief of the Execution Branch of the Health IT Innovation and Advanced Technology Development Division at the Defense Health Agency, and Navy Cmdr. Leslie Riggs, director of the Navy Blood Program, attended a demonstration of the system at the university in May.


In May, the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center’s apheresis section of the Armed Services Blood Bank Center in Bethesda, Md., began treating platelets collected at the donor center with the new pathogen reduction technology.Update: Pathogen Reduction Live at Walter Reed
By Jessica Pellegrini, ASBP Staff Writer

In May, the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center’s apheresis section of the Armed Services Blood Bank Center in Bethesda, Md., began treating platelets collected at the donor center with the new pathogen reduction technology.




Bacterial contamination, viruses and increased international travel can pose a risk to the safety of the world’s blood supply.Pathogen Reduction Technology Helps Combat Blood Borne Disease
By Jessica Pellegrini, ASBP Staff Writer

Bacterial contamination, viruses and increased international travel can pose a risk to the safety of the world’s blood supply. However, new pathogen reduction technologies are helping to mitigate those risks.




An innovative clinical process begun at Craig Joint Theater Hospital Jan. 18Cold Storage Platelets Key To Saving Lives
By Kevin Walston, 10th Mountain Division and Fort Drum Public Affairs

An innovative clinical process begun at Craig Joint Theater Hospital Jan. 18 is paving the way to save more lives of patients suffering from acute trauma, a local official said.




'Golden Hour' Policy Saved U.S. Lives in Afghanistan"Golden Hour" Policy Saved U.S. Lives in Afghanistan
By Patricia Kime, Staff Writer, Military Times

More U.S. troops survived life-threatening injuries in Afghanistan after Defense Secretary Robert Gates ordered evacuation helicopters to extract wounded personnel within 60 minutes, a period known in emergency medicine as the "golden hour."




BloodWithout BordersBlood Without Borders: The Emerging World of Cold-Store Platelets
By Ramin A. Khalili, USAMRMC Combat Casualty Care Research Program

After moderating a lengthy session on blood products at the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Aug. 18, Dr. Heather Pidcoke summed up two hours of dense technological conversation into just five words.



Plasma ForceFreeze-Dried Plasma Effort Seeks to Increase Battlefield Survival Rates

The Army Blood Program, a service component of the tri-service Armed Services Blood Program, is currently involved in an initiative to collect licensed fresh plasma from volunteer donors. The donations will be converted into freeze-dried plasma, a new product that may significantly increase the survival rates for service members wounded on the battlefield.



Improving Disaster Response Through a Reliable Blood SupplyImproving Disaster Response Through a Reliable Blood Supply
U.S. Pacific Command News Release

The U.S. military works with Asia-Pacific partner nations to improve Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response capacity by helping ensure a reliable and interoperable blood supply throughout the region. Since 2009, the U.S. Pacific Command Blood Safety Program has worked with civilian and military agencies of partner nations...


Theater Blood Mobile Research and Development ProjectTheater Blood Mobile Research and Development Project

An early demonstration video for the Theater Blood Mobile Research and Development project. The video highlights the development of the solution to address the low communication/no communication capability gap and helps track blood in theater operations.




Theater Blood Management: Tracking Products During Military OperationsTheater Blood Management: Tracking Products During Military Operations
Don Dahlheimer, ASBP Deputy Director of Information Management

In 2007, the Armed Services Blood Program began to track blood products in Iraq and Afghanistan. Previously, blood management in theater was handled by the Defense Blood Standard System. However, field experts encountered difficulties with DBSS, so the ASBP decided to build its own system.


TRALI Risk Mitigation Recommendations Approved by AABBTRALI Risk Mitigation Recommendations Approved by AABB
Jessica Pellegrini, ASBP Staff Writer 28 February, 2014

The AABB has approved a new TRALI risk mitigation standard to be implemented April 1. According to AABB Bulletin 14-02, all plasma and whole blood collected and prepared for allogeneic transfusion after April 1, must be either from males, or females who have never been pregnant or who have had a negative HLA antibodies test since their most recent pregnancy.



Photo of the XSTAT deviceSaving Lives by Saving Blood
Mr. Jeffrey M Soares, Army Medicine, 30 July, 2013

In an age of ultra high-tech devices that are worthy of screen time in a big budget Hollywood action movie, one might be surprised to discover that a very "unglamorous" and simplistic medical device is being developed by the Combat Casualty Care Research Program of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Md., that may soon save lives on the battlefield and beyond.