ASBP: Together, We Can Make a Difference
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Follow Navy Captain Fahie, program director, as he visits critical military blood program locations.

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ARMED SERVICES BLOOD PROGRAM OFFICE

For more information contact:

Air Force Lt. Col. Jerome L. Vinluan | Deputy Director
703-681-8011 | jerome.l.vinluan.mil@mail.mil

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE




TOGETHER, WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

FALLS CHURCH, Va., June 1, 2017 – This summer, the Armed Services Blood Program reminds everyone that Together, We Can Make a Difference.

According to Navy Capt. Roland Fahie, ASBP director, during World War II a severely injured service member had about a 50 percent chance of survival. Today, those odds have increased significantly to more than 90 percent, thanks in large part to the availability of blood and blood products farther forward on the battlefield.

“By getting blood closer to the point of injury, we are able to save more lives,” Fahie said. “But there are a lot of moving parts needed to make sure this happens. Our donors, staff members, volunteers, blood drive coordinators, and the doctors, surgeons, and medics on the battlefield are all vital to a successful mission. Together, we save lives. Together, we are difference makers.”

Since 1962, the ASBP has been the sole provider of blood and blood products for the United States military. The tri-service organization relies on blood donors to supply blood to ill or injured service members and their families worldwide, in both peace and war.

Since the first volunteer blood donor service opened, there has been a constant outreach for blood donors because there is no substitute for human blood. It cannot be manufactured and cannot be stored indefinitely — red blood cells must be used within 35 to 42 days after collection and platelets must be used within five days. Because blood may be needed at any time, it must be collected regularly.

Now that the summer months are in full-swing, many of the ASBP’s donors are on leave and families are vacationing; but the need for blood remains constant. For these reasons, the ASBP needs donors to roll up their sleeves and donate blood today.  

“Although 50 percent of the U.S. population is eligible to donate, only about 5 percent does,” Fahie said. “Therefore, regular blood donors are vital to ensure that lifesaving blood is available year-round. But we also need blood drive coordinators to help set up blood drives, volunteers to bring refreshments, and supporters to spread the word about or mission online or on their installation. This summer, I encourage all of us to join together to save lives. Together, We Can Make a Difference.”   

About the Armed Services Blood Program
Since 1962, the Armed Services Blood Program has served as the sole provider of blood for the United States military. As a tri-service organization, the ASBP collects, processes, stores and distributes blood and blood products to Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families worldwide. As one of four national blood collection organizations trusted to ensure the nation has a safe, potent blood supply, the ASBP works closely with our civilian counterparts by sharing donors on military installations where there are no military blood collection centers and by sharing blood products in times of need to maximize availability of this national treasure. To find out more about the ASBP or to schedule an appointment to donate, please visit www.militaryblood.dod.mil. To interact directly with ASBP staff members, see more photos or get the latest news, follow @militaryblood on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube and Pinterest.  Find the drop. Donate.

The Armed Services Blood Program is a proud recipient of the Army Maj. Gen. Keith L. Ware Public Affairs award for journalism.